Category

Philadelphia Injury Lawyer

You Be the Judge!

I am working on a “slip and fall” case slated for jury trial in early November.  My dear readers, I would like for you to “sit on the jury” for this trial. Please let me know what you think of my case and how I can improve the chances for a successful verdict.
On September 1, 2012, Sandra C. was walking in the buffet line at a suburban Philadelphia Casino and slipped on an oily…

Jury Instructions and Deliberations in Personal Injury Litigation

JURY INSTRUCTIONS AND DELIBERATIONS

The judge’s instructions to the jury represent the very last stage of the trial before the jury retires to decide the case. In his or her instructions, the judge advises the jury about the law that applies to the case. The judge uses certain standard instructions but may also permit the lawyers to influence which instructions are given and how they ar…

Jury Instructions in Personal Injury Litigation

JURY INSTRUCTIONS AND DELIBERATIONS

The judge’s instructions to the jury represent the very last stage of the trial before the jury retires to decide the case. In his or her instructions, the judge advises the jury about the law that applies to the case. The judge uses certain standard instructions but may also permit the lawyers to influence which instructions are given and how they ar…

More Objections in Personal Injury Litigation

Irrelevant

Irrelevant is a commonly made objection. A question is relevant if the answer really matters to the case. Conversely, a question is irrelevant if the answer does not make the facts more or less true than they would be without that answer.

Sometimes the answer may have some relevance to the case but would be so unfairly prejudicial that the judge will not permit it. For example,…

The Defense Case in Personal Injury Litigation

THE DEFENSE CASE

When all your evidence has been presented, your attorney rests your case. The defense attorney may then ask the judge to dismiss the case for insufficient proof. This virtually never works, yet for technical reasons the insurance company’s lawyer often makes this request. Then the presentation of the defense case begins.

The first witness presented by the defense is…

Your Testimony in Personal Injury Litigation

YOUR TESTIMONY

Your case usually begins with your testimony, both on direct and cross examination. Your testimony is perhaps the most important part of the trial. No matter how skillful and prepared the lawyer is, if the jury does not like or does not believe you, the result will not be favorable.

Direct Examination

Direct examination involves your testimony in response to your…

Peremptory Challenges in Jury Selection for Personal Injury Cases

Peremptory Challenges

Each attorney in a one plaintiff/one defendant case is permitted during voir dire to eliminate or strike a set number of jurors from the jury without stating the reason. These are called peremptory challenges. In cases with multiple plaintiffs or defendants, the judge decides the number of strikes available to each attorney. There are many different theories that…

Exploring Coverage Under Homeowners Insurance

Perhaps the most misunderstood of insurance coverages is homeowners.  Did you know that your homeowners insurance may cover you for losses that occur away from your home?  It all depends on the language found in the small print of your policy.  Your insurance company hopes you’ll never take on the daunting challenge of deciphering that fine print.  It’s time to change that.

Insurers…

Independent Medical Exam or Defense Medical Exam?

THE DEFENSE MEDICAL EXAMINATION

The insurance company has the right in every personal injury case to have you examined by a doctor it chooses. This examination represents the third stage of the discovery process. The insurance lawyers like to refer to this as an independent medical examination or an IME. Plaintiff’s lawyers have begun insisting that this exam be called a defense medica…

Final Tips for your Discovery Deposition

Exaggerating

You should not exaggerate your injuries or losses, but you should not hesitate to explain fully all of the injuries and damages caused by the accident. Watch out especially for questions such as, “Did you suffer any other injuries?” A negative answer at the deposition can limit you at the time of trial. You must think long and hard before committing yourself to such an answer. If…

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